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A List of Questions About Beyond the Classroom Aquarium (for example: Why does it not cost less? Why select it over curricula produced by major publishing houses? Why use it when student success would require extensive effort, time, work and support? Why use this curriculum in view of the financial expenses it requires? and more)

20 Apr

Starting with…

        Question NUMBER TEN-A;

10A. Why, Aside from:

  • Receiving 60% royalty on all monies beyond the minimum $41.90 sale price that covers Kindle’s printing cost ($25.14) and other fees ($16.76)? As for example the price for this book is currently set at $58.56 I may expect to receive a royalty of $10.00. ….AND;
  • After years of committing portions of my own personal teaching salary funds to procure and install classroom aquatic ecosystem materials, equipment and livestock, AND;
  • Committing further personal monies associated with attendance at more than a dozen classes, professional conferences and professional development workshops to explore and develop Beyond the Classroom Aquarium? curriculum related ideas, AND;
  • Dispensing additional funds associated with royalty payments to other publishers who granted premission to use portions of their content in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium, AND;
  • Considering the many intangible costs associated with years of reading, studying, photocopying, etc. related to the curriculum, AND;
  • Years (20+) spent thinking, writing, and revising conceptual designs of the Beyond the Classroom Aquarium curriculum and the persistence to complete it; Why then

        … does this book not cost less?

Moving right along to:

          Question Number 10-B

10B. If

  • a publishing company did not publish it (Beyond the Classroom Aquarium is self-published and print on demand) …and
  • my school district’s curriculum committee did not authorize adoption of it,

Why should I give it the time of day? After all, a lot of experts and top dollar educational corporations have developed and endorsed a plethora of reviewed and highly rated curricular materials.

     … Question Number NINE

9. The level of knowledge and skill required of the lead teacher in this project based curriculum is uncommonly extreme. Getting students to be successful with this curriculum would require extensive effort, time, work and support. No thanks (Please share your reaction to this comment).

    … Question Number EIGHT.

8. It would cost way too much to implement the projects in this curriculum at my school (a small fortune). Even though it may well be worth it, where do startup funds to implement this curriculum come from? Why DIY so many systems and components when many high quality components can be purchased (plug and play). Cutting corners and finding novel ways to design and produce system components is just not how I view my role as an educator (Please share your reaction to this comment).

    … Question Number SEVEN.

7. Projects in this curriculum are designed to address modern day math standards, next generation science standards, and standards relating to integration of technology, engineering and the arts into learning activities. This kind of integration may make daily work with students more complicated than some educators might prefer (Please share your reaction to this comment).

      … Question Number SIX.

6.  The man who wrote this curriculum has put a lot of passion into it. Somehow he devised a way to unify all of these aquatic ecosystem themed projects into a logical curricular sequence. In addition to being a veteran educator (of more than 35 years), he went to great lengths to ensure this work would address a range of issuses of interest in numerous professional aquatic ecosystem fields of study and work. Obsessive/compulsive? Maybe he should have just joined a rock band instead? (Please share your reaction to this comment).

     … Question Number FIVE.

5. How can modern day persons perform these projects via digital learning or while being home schooled? These conditions make implementation of such a project based curriculum even more difficult. (Please share your reaction to this comment).

     … Question Number FOUR.

4. I think students would never buy-in to a yearlong project based, aquatic ecosystem themed structuted sequence of multidisciplinary learning activities. They have such limited attention spans and get bored so easily….  What do you think? (Please share your reaction to this comment).

    … Question Number THREE.

3. What examples of application of knowlegde and skill could be presented from students who have participated in this sequence of projects – in science, technology, engineering, art, and math? The author seems to think that learning about aquatic ecosystem is an enriching vehicle for guiding students to learn math & more (and apply it in real world contexts). (Please share your reaction to this comment).

     … Question Number TWO.

2. What might a classroom look like after a full school year of successful project participation in all 14 projects and related assessment activities has occurred? Could such a learning space serve as a demonstration  model and professional development learning space? (Please share your reaction to this comment).

     … And finally, Last but not least,

         Question Number ONE.

1. Has this author put together a Beyond the Classroom Aquarium professional development workshop for interested educators; a workshop that could be held in an operational beyond the classroom aquatic ecosystem learning space? Would it be FREE? (Please share your reaction to this comment).

I believe you can find answers to these questions and many others in the book. I will be happy to read your own comment about any of the questions on this list or other relevant concern(s) even if you have not yet read or used this curriculum. In particular, I am deeply interested in what you believe a fair price for this book might be. What do you think is a reasonable expectation for a royalty of this book? Although I did not write this book to make money I did hope I might recover expenses in the process of sharing this amazong curriculum.

Thank you.

Features of Beyond the Classroom Aquarium that Many Educators Find Appealing

7 May

Safety First! cannot be emphasized enough.

John Dewey’s statement:Give students something to do, not something to learn; and the doing is of such a nature to demand thinking, and learning naturally results,” is one time-tested inspirational educational standard upon which “Beyond the Classroom Aquarium” projects have been designed.

The flexible/scalable nature of the projects also provides differentiation space for many traditional classroom settings in which student abilities and skills vary widely. Students who work with projects in ‘Beyond the Classroom Aquarium‘ are all able to naturally connect with their project work, love the projects and LEARN

Beyond the Classroom Aquarium is student-centered and FUN! … the kind of curriculum more educators are blending into their own instructional practice every day. By their very nature, the learning activities and projects warmly invite educators to adapt them for their own unique groups of students.

Instructional flexibility, is derived from the optional structure that each educator may adopt while guiding students through this sequence of projects. Some educators may prefer to guide an entire class through one project at a time in an extremely linear sequence. Others might adopt an extremely different structure and at particularly opportune times (as suggested in the text) guide an entire class of separate project teams as a band teacher might guide different sections of an orchestra through unique design, assembly, and operational stages of their “assigned” aquatic ecosystem project; bringing together all the different sections only after all component bits and pieces are closely aligned. In some cases, an educator may feel comfortable giving a select number of students opportunities to work on one or more project independently – while a majority of the class works together on a project under the direct supervision of the educator. Many teachers appreciate this kind of instructional flexibility and implementing such executive decisions regarding which approach might be best for any given student or class. 

These projects are scalable such that teachers can personalize projects for students in a class and also for students at a range of grade levels (from middle school and beyond). Also of extreme concern for teachers and students is the fact that the projects are of high interest; they are authentic! This natural authenticity encourages student engagement. In addition, many educators also appreciate specific suggestions provided in project description text that encourages strategies for reaching out to the community (early and often) for technical support, assistance and voluntary sharing of specific knowledge, skills, materials and equipment.

Most “Beyond the Classroom Aquarium” field trips are designed (and strategically scheduled) to support successful student implementation of aquatic ecosystem design, assembly, and operation (and beyond). As described in the text, with adequate forethought and preparation teachers will use a number of field trips – with the assistance of a small team of skilled parents and trades-persons – to introduce prepared student teams to safe use of power tools. For example, during a field trip immediately after final student ecosystem designs have been approved (and reviewed in advance by volunteer trades persons) students can be guided to measure out and cut to specifications all system design components (electrical, plumbing, and carpentry) in their team plans in preparation for final assembly upon return to the classroom.

By designing projects in this curriculum with a DIY (Do It Yourself) mindset this curriculum is also designed to be economically scalable. Fully functional student designs can be implemented while expensive bell & whistle features (often unused) that come with commercially available equipment can be intentionally and inexpensively omitted from a project. If needed later, students may design and assemble their own add-on system components. Furthermore, successful preliminary write-ups of team design presentations during the project approval process may require inclusion (and approval) of detailed project cost estimates. This makes for many great / motivational learning opportunities that are also budgetarily safe – many teachers administrators and school boards find this kind of thinking and savings extremely important. A generalized budget estimation sheet is provided in the book to help the classroom teacher establish a project budget template for the entire school year. Each project budget may also encourage students to devise timely ways to get additional funds (via concerts, plays, bake sales, dances, grants, donations, marathons, fishing derbies, carnivals, auctions, and other events, etc.).

Beyond the Classroom Aquarium helps educators establish an educational focus in their classroom that is sustainable for an entire school year. Each year, the unfolding evolution and classroom exhibition of projects with each unique group and age/maturity level of students will be different. Introductory information in the book includes a suggested project timeline and school year calendar that is designed to ensure sufficient time to highlight as many practical project learning experiences as possible – as described in the post in which I provide an overview of the sequence of projects in this curriculum. 

Skills and knowledge students acquire by participation in the sequential anthology of projects (and included ‘end of project’ assessment activities) is relevant to them in their classrooms and beyond. Teachers will also learn a great deal every year especially as student curiosity grows and many new technologies become available each semester. Many educators also appreciate direct access their students have to a small but extremely useful computer lab with computer technology and software for individualized math instruction, and software for CAD, 3D printing, statistical analysis and to write programs and sketches to send to microcontrollers. Learning is unavoidable; as long as there are carbon based life forms on Earth, this program can never get old/stale.

Many educators also find the resources provided in the extensive bibliography of this 347 page book invaluable. 

Throughout the year and especially during each end of project assessment, Beyond the Classroom Aquarium students are guided to document their work – in a comprehensive portfolio and demonstrate strategies they have used to incorporate their study of mathematics into each project. Assessments are also designed to help students illustrate ways they experience and understand aquatic ecosystem components and their design – including aspects of computer automation and other digital technologies. Educators who guide students through the projects in this curriculum AND those who carefully review its sequence of projects find it provides multidimensional learning experiences that lead students to develop knowledge and skills that surpass those of students who participate in curricular learning projects with a narrower scope.

Of course numerous Beyond the Classroom Aquarium projects address aquaculture techniques. But, students who participate in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium projects learn about much more than aquaculture! Similarly, by participating in the anthology of projects in this book students also learn about much more than: aquaponics; coral propagation; plankton culture; authentic aquatic ecosystem design and construction; design and development of auxiliary aquatic ecosystem components; and aquatic ecosystem research and research design; as they are guided to explore opportunities to apply developing aquatic ecosystem knowledge and skills beyond their classroom in their communities and to develop a vision for their own futures that includes skillful practice of STEM abilities and environmental stewardship.

I believe another very real feature of this curriculum that makes it more appealing to many educators is the overarching satisfaction (personal &  professional) they may derive from witnessing the impact that this project work has upon their students. I believe by the end of the school year teachers will find many more of their students than might be expected have transformed into well-informed, capable and caring stewards of the Earth and life upon it.  

Beyond the Classroom Aquarium is a cohesive entity. In part, Beyond the Classroom Aquarium exists by virtue of the fact that a substantial portion of particularly STEM-oriented aquatic-ecosystem related educational resources, have been developed by a broad range of large public agencies and interest groups (with noble yet often divergent purposes).

Beyond the Classroom Aquarium is the result of the author’s desire/vision to fully develop and share his version of a comprehensive, sequentially organized, curricular anthology of STEM-Oriented, aquatic ecosystem themed educational activities with his students and colleagues. To my knowledge, there is no other practical, hands-on, STEM-project oriented, aquatic ecosystem teaching guide or resource book like Beyond the Classroom Aquarium. Projects and activities in it may be effectively used to supplement standard science, technology, engineering, and math texts and classroom learning activities for a wide range of students.

Each of the fourteen projects and related activities in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium guides teachers and students to adhere to consistent and high standards of work/performance. Many students learn more successfully, throughout a school year, when the standard operating procedure is to repeatedly provide them with practical opportunities to productively apply and expand their skills and knowledge.

To read more about Beyond the Classroom Aquarium you may click on a link to one of the four bulleted posts below. Each post offers additional information about: the curriculum, the author, the program’s structure/format, and acknowledgement of support others have provided in curriculum development or in piloting of activities with students.

Previously at: https://www.createspace.com/4888083 book files are now held at my Kindle Direct Print account which has NOT yet been activated to sell the book.

Please contact Robert Jakus directly for more information about Beyond the Classroom Aquarium.

Return to the BEYOND the CLASSROOM AQUARIUM – HOME by clicking here.

Kind and Generous Benefactors of Beyond the Classroom Aquarium Project Development and Piloting

23 Apr

Numerous persons have provided equipment, materials, services, and much appreciated advice in my first attempts to share STEM-based aquatic ecosystem projects with my students. Prominent among these early Beyond the Classroom Aquarium supporters have been:

* Sho-Tank Aquariums; Matt Jensen, until recently the proprietor of this business (now residing in Hawaii – 🙂 ) offered ongoing and unparalleled support to me in my efforts to develop #BtheCA (Twitter Hashtag) projects by providing a range of livestock and related equipment at costs that made it possible for students to experience a wide range of aquatic organisms (on my teacher’s salary). In my exhaustive search, I never found a more constant source of support for implementing these ideas. Thanks Matt (Aloha to you & your family)!

* SeaQuest Marine; Donated and set-up in the classroom, a new 55-gallon aquarium and filtration system along with a state-of-the-art reef capable lighting system. When Jim Whitney came to my classroom to help my students & I set up the system he was amazingly warm, caring and enthusiastic towards my students and my vision. Now in Palm Beach I wish him ongoing happiness and success.

* Allen-Bradley and Rockwell Automation; Donated a programmable logic controller to use in developing a prototype plankton culture and collection system for classroom use.

* Grow-Masters; Provided seeds and grow media related to an aquaponics system that students designed and assembled.

* Reef Propagations, Inc.; Donated an aging but active pair of nest-laying clownfish enabling students to participate in efforts to raise larvae.

* National Marine Educators Association (NMEA); Published an account of student experiences in designing and maintaining a 500 gallon aquaponics system.

Although a portion of the curricular activities in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium were developed by large national agencies (supported through tax dollars – and thus generally considered “public domain,” given proper citation etc.), numerous non-governmental agencies, writers, and developers of other educational activities used in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium have generously granted me permission (either directly or via website permissions) to include portions of their copyrighted material in one or more of the projects in the curriculum. Will you please support these people and organizations (in particular) if and when you are in a position to do so?

  • Gerry Marten – Author and Proponent of “Human Ecology” his book by that name is available free online. Relevant information and links are available on his webpage: http://www.gerrymarten.com/human-ecology/tableofcontents.html . Thank you for speaking with me on the phone Gerald – our discussion of your Apo Island experience and related learning materials was deeply appreciated. I appreciate your agreement to allow me to include Apo Island learning materials in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium.
  • Martin A. Moe, Jr.  – Marine Biologist, Author of many great books about marine aquariums, and active spokesperson for the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary. Martin corresponded with me with great understanding and patience. We ultimately identified ways for me to include various text published by Martin in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium. One of his colleagues (Joe) provided me with the first pair of spawning Clown fish that I shared with my students. 
  • Brandy Moran – marine science curriculum developer
  • Don Carner – a long-standing proponent of “Do-It-Yourself” aquarium projects. In our correspondence he seemed surprised that I would think to consider including information that he wrote in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium to help students analyze lighting systems they might develop.
  • Alex Brylske – Chief Editor of Dive Training Magazine, college professor (Florida Keys Community College) and inspirational writer about the ocean – magnanimously agreed to allow me to use his writing about experiences with a unique group of coral propagators and their amazing work. I could feel him smiling through his email correspondence with me.
  • Tom Shaw – webmaster holding rights to the Hidden Mickey’s web site content (upon which I based the laminar flow fountain design project in Beyond the Classroom Aquarium).
  • the Aquarium Guys – for presenting a nice page about “is your fish really sick” on their webpage
  • Gary V. Deutschmann – for developing a nice paper about “the History of Hydroponics”
  • Jason Buchheim – director of Odyssey Expeditions and developer of many web pages of fabulous educational pages about the oceans 
  • Charles Drewes – He devoted his life to learning about invertebrates and passing this information on to his students and the public – his university web page contains great information about culturing aquatic black worms (among other things)
  • Thanks to Mr. Dick Irish of Wilmington, NC – whom I first met at an Arduino/Raspberry Pi Meetup. He provided me with a MEGA to work with and encouraged my ongoing efforts to develop a prototype laminar flow fountain.

To read more about Beyond the Classroom Aquarium you may click on a link to one of the four bulleted posts below. Each post offers additional information about: the curriculum, the author, the program’s structure/format, and acknowledgement of support others have provided in curriculum development or in piloting of activities with students.

https://www.createspace.com/4888083

Please contact Robert Jakus directly for more information about Beyond the Classroom Aquarium.

To Return to BEYOND the CLASSROOM AQUARIUM – HOME click here.

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